Have you conditioned yourself for ultimate success?

In other words, have you trained yourself to remain committed to your goal, no matter what?

And I really mean No Matter What.

Maybe you believe you have. Maybe you know you haven’t, but you’re working on it.

Too often, in the pursuit of our goals, we stop at the problem.

What does that look like?

It may mean that there’s a live event you want to attend, but you believe that because you live far away, you can’t attend it.

Truth moment: I’m fighting this right now in my own life.

It may mean that you’re passionate about starting and running a world-changing business, but you believe that because you’re a parent, you can’t spend time or energy on entrepreneurship.

It may mean that you believe you need to put boundaries up because you give so much that you have no time for yourself.

It may mean that you believe you’re not smart enough—or have the financial freedom— to build the business you want.

All of these “reasons” for not relentlessly pursuing your goals are indicators of not having the bandwidth or belief to reach your objectives! They’ll prevent you from staying committed to your vision.

The challenge here is that we often believe these reasons are not only true but that they’re also impassable. We condition ourselves to stop when we encounter them.

What if these thoughts weren’t so powerful?
What if you could travel past or over those reasons and continue moving toward your vision?

What if you could condition yourself for ultimate success?

I want you to ask yourself that question: What if?

I’d like to share a story about my friend and mentor, Wayne Dyer. If you haven’t heard of him, he was a well-known author, speaker, and pioneer in the field of self-development, and known by his fans as “the father of motivation.”

One day, he drove to the airport to travel to a faraway city for a speaking engagement. When he got to the airport, all the flights to his destination had been canceled due to weather.

But he was committed to keeping his speaking engagement.

The ticket girl kept telling him, “I’m sorry, Mr. Dyer. All of the flights are canceled. There is nothing we can do.”

He didn’t focus on making her look harder, pushing her to work, forcing her to figure out a new flight for him.

Instead, he worked on her mindset.

He said, “Would you just be open to the possibility that there could be a flight available?”

The story goes that he made this request with a smile on his face—and that she was laughing as she listened to him.

And I’m sure by now you can guess what happened. The ticket girl found a flight for Wayne Dyer. She flew him to another city, and from that city to his destination, where he arrived in time to follow through on his speaking engagement.

Wayne Dyer was fiercely committed to his vision.

Often when we encounter a problem when we’re trying to get something done, we immediately become frustrated.

But what if you could take the approach Wayne Dyer did? What if you looked at the various areas in your life and asked, “What if?”

“What if there is a way to get around, or past, this problem and remain committed to my vision?”

When you’re the flexible person who will do whatever it takes—and when you can do it with a smile on your face—people around you will merge to your leadership.

When they do, miracles happen—just like the ticket girl at the airport in the Wayne Dyer story.

Let’s bring this around to business for a moment. Let’s say you’re running a marketing campaign through email. You need a good subject line to get people to open the emails, and then you need the email to be good enough to get people to take action, right?

In its entirety, all of that seems pretty overwhelming—countless emails and subject lines and click-through rates . . .

What if you just focused on the subject line?

One step at a time, right?
Write the subject line, and then write the email.

Overcome one problem or reason at a time; remain committed to your vision.

Here’s another real-life example for you:

Before he made his first million dollars, Joel Osteen, the senior pastor of Lakewood Church in Houston (and a famous TV evangelist), had no idea how he was going to do it.

He met with his crew and told them that God had put it on his heart to make a million dollars—and that he had no idea how it would happen but that it would definitely happen.

Of course, he’s made millions upon millions through his work. Why? Because he dealt with one problem at a time as he relentlessly pursued his commitment to make one million dollars.

So how can you put this to work in your life?

Step One: Declare that you’re going to do this.

Many people get to this point: I declare I’m going to do this. I don’t know all the steps or how it’s going to happen, but I have faith that it’s going to happen. You don’t have to know how it’s going to happen. You don’t have to know all the steps. All you have to do is commit.

Step Two: Put in the hard work, every day, to make it happen.

Fewer people get to this next step. Do the work. Nothing is going to happen if you don’t take the steps to pursue your vision, right? Wayne Dyer would not have made it to that speaking engagement if he hadn’t talked to the ticket girl and gotten her to change her mindset. He took action. Joel Osteen wouldn’t have made his first million (or his subsequent millions) if he hadn’t taken action.

A quick note here: truthfully consider whether the actions you’re taking are moving you toward your vision. For example, are you spending tons of resources on a website you don’t need? That’s a stalling tactic. We often spend so much time getting ready to get ready, believing we need one thing before we can accomplish something else. But so often, it’s just not true. So get clear on what you really need to do in order to move toward your vision—and then do that.

Step Three: Remain committed to your vision.

When you encounter a problem, don’t stop! When you hit that moment—and you will—remind yourself that there has to be a way.

THIS is how you condition yourself to stop giving up and start achieving ultimate success!

 

I’d love to hear from you on this.

In the comments below, post your answer to one (or both) of these questions: Where have you hit a “problem” recently? What did you do—or what will you do—to move past it and stay committed to your vision?